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First look: Corsair iCue Link. The solution for cable spaghetti in your cupboard?


From BAT to ATX

Many of the things you encounter when building a PC took shape years ago. The ATX standard dates from 1995 and was devised by Intel to cope with the heat development of the Pentium II. Before that, the Baby AT format (BAT) was popular, which indeed had its origins in IBM’s AT computer. Looking back, these standards have had a lot of impact in recent years. Developments naturally continued after 1995. As a result, basic motherboards still resemble the original design, but plenty of changes have been made as well. Many connections have been added, such as PCI Express, SATA and USB.

A motherboard such as the Abit BP6 from the early days of Hardware Info does not look much like a modern motherboard for an Intel or AMD processor.


The Abit BP6 was an ATX motherboard from the early days of Hardware Info.

You see a lot of development in some areas, especially with regard to cooling. Air cooling was the standard for years, and lighting consisted of little more than an LED that indicated whether the system was switched on or not.

Nowadays that is different. Processors run much warmer than the Pentium II of the time, and many people see RGB lighting as an addition to the design of their computer. This leads to enormous cable clutter in modern systems.

Various manufacturers try to make it easier for you by offering the option to connect fans together, so-called ‘daisy chaining’. That solution is not new; Lian Li and Phanteks even have a lawsuit going on about it. Corsair also supplies such products. In this article we look at iCue Link, the new system from this brand.

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